Study Abroad



SUMMER PROGRAMS IN GREECE

 

A STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM IN THE ANCIENT CAPITAL OF EUROPE

The American University of Athens, has been organizing study abroad programs in Athens since 1982.

The program has the structure, diversity, range and facilities promoted by an Accelerated American University program. Furthermore, students have the opportunity to meet with Greek or other students, and to participate in a wide variety of extra-mural, cultural or recreational activities. By having a carefully selected faculty, AUA offers quality education in a wide range of courses .

  • A STUDY YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN GREEK CIVILIZATION

or

  • A SUMMER PROGRAM with a variety of courses for students interested in

– ART HISTORY

– PRE-MEDICAL or any General Educational Science requirement.

The program is mainly concerned with Greece and southeastern Europe and all aspects of Ancient, Byzantine and Modern Greek civilization. The program includes courses covering material spanning Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic and Byzantine periods, as well as the history of the National Revolution and Greece
today. An integral part of this curriculum involves field trips. Modern Greek is taught intensively during the first semester, however, previous knowledge is not a prerequisite given that instruction in all courses at AUA in English.

There are three contact hours per week for each course with the exception of some language courses which meet more often. Five courses a semester are considered the equivalent of full-time study. The length of the semester is fifteen weeks including the period of examination.

Studying abroad for summer or even a whole year is one of the best ways to obtain valuable insight into how other peoples work and live. It provides the occasion for students to profit from a richness of experiences and to achieve a level of maturity.

Living and studying abroad is a cumulative experience. The advantages of summer or an academic year abroad represent far more than the sum of two semesters, be it linguistically, culturally or intellectually.

It provides students an unparalleled opportunity of living in a modern country enriched by a uniquely varied past. |t broadens the students’ knowledge of both modern and classical Greek culture.

So potent has been the appeal of Greece, so passionate the devotion which it arouses, that there is almost no sphere of spiritual or intellectual activity which has not been touched by its living flame’’. Sir Maurice Bowra, The Greek Experience.

LIBRARY FACILITIES

The students, have access to the Library which contains a wide variety of reference books and slides. Electronic data retrieval is also available, allowing access to the main European or American libraries and data banks.

In addition to the AUA Library there are several useful libraries in the area available for use by our students. These include, the British Council Library, the American Library and the Library of the Technical Chamber of Greece.

STUDENT BODY

Students participating in either the Summer program or the St
udy year abroad may be

majoring in the areas of Liberal Arts , Science, or even premedical studies. AUA cooperates with various study abroad associations and student exchange programs.

WHO SHOULD APPLY

AUA considers the following students eligible for admission to its academic programs:

College freshmen

College sophomores

College juniors

Students wishing to enroll in a 3-year program after which they may transfer to institutions in the U.S., U.K. or Canada to earn their degrees.

Summer sessions are designed for students who wish to accelerate their programs towards completion of requirements for their degrees, for students who wish to earn credits to transfer to other colleges and universities, and for newly admitted freshmen who wish to start their academic program earlier.

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS

Whether you are here for just a few weeks or a year , your surroundings should support your goals. No matter what your preference, AUA has ample housing options to suit your needs.

In area neighborhoods, housing comes in numerous lifestyle, architectural, and geographic options. Choose the place that suits your tastes, needs, and budget while making Athens your academic home.

FIELD TRIPS

Field trips form an integral part of the study program. Trips are planned to archaeological sites:

Brauron, Thorikos, Sounion, Lavrion, Mycenae, Epidauros, Delphi, Corinth, Olympia, Daphne, Eleusis, Marathon, Macedonia, Crete and Santorini. Students are accompanied by University officials and instructors on all outings.

SPECIAL PROGRAM CERTIFICATE IN GREEK STUDIES

AUA will provide visiting students a Certificate in Greek Studies, if they complete a total number of six courses in Greek Civilization. The Certificate is evidence of having completed an intensive systematic study of Greek culture.

A particular feature of this program is that a number of the courses include visits to historical and archaeological sites, museums, and theaters.

BENEFITS FROM STUDYING AT AUA

Classes are small and emphasis is placed on individual initiative in the process of learning.

Extensive use is made of the great cultural resources available in Greece. AUA makes every effort to expose students to the richness of Athens life as part of the educational experience: frequent trips to museums, art galleries, archaeological sites, and theaters.

AUA provides visiting students with the opportunity to live and study with students from different nations and cultures which in itself broadens the students’ horizons.

SUMMER PROGRAMS

The summer program consists of courses and activities designed to meet the special needs and interests of students from various countries who wish to pursue a college education parallel to that of the U.S. system. Upon completion they will be issued an official transcript so that they can transfer credits earned at AUA to their home institutions.

Students may also enjoy, during the summer program, the events offered by the internationally renowned Athens Festival held in the Herodios Atticus Theater, where splendid dramatic productions and concerts are performed.

The summer program includes excursions to cultural attractions in and around Athens, such as the Acropolis, Plaka, National Gardens, Sounion and Delphi. These excursions are coordinated and supplemented by class discussions, orientation sessions and illustrated lectures. Students are accompanied by University officials and instructors on all outings.

During the weekends, students are free to explore the Greek countryside, the beautiful beaches of the Saronic Gulf or the nearby islands of the Aegean Sea. They can also visit the numerous museums, archaeological sites, taverns, cafes and theaters.

STUDENT LIFE

AUA encourages students to coordinate their academic goals and personal experiences in order to develop their potential to the fullest extent.

Student life therefore focuses on enhancing study skills, use of leisure time and social and leadership abilities. AUA’s small and unique student body and staff truly make this possible.

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL SERVICES

The University is proud of its Office of International Services which assists students in adjusting to studies in Greece. It organizes activities which encourage cultural and intellectual exchange between Greek and foreign students. More importantly, however, it prepares a complete orientation program for foreign students at the beginning of each semester and provides academic and social support and assistance in dealing with immigration matters.

LOCATION OF AUA

Athens, the capital of Greece and cradle of European civilization, constitutes an intellectual and artistic center, one of the largest in the eastern Mediterranean. The Greek capital has also grown to be one of the most important trade centers in the southeastern area of Europe.

Athens, which belongs to that privileged class of historic cities of antiquity and continues to maintain the glory of its name, offers students a fascinating selection of cultural events. AUA is located in the center of Athens right across the American Embassy and the Music Hall.

MISSION

To respond to the evolving needs of society by offering capable and motivated students a quality education necessary for professional development, intellectual growth and preparation for graduate studies.

STRUCTURE AND EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY

To achieve this mission, AUA places students at the center of its efforts, values structure and strongly emphasizes academic excellence through highly qualified faculty and a well equipped learning environment.

The small size classes, the usage of the English language in instruction, the meticulous selection of faculty curricula and teaching methodologies as well as admission of foreign students reflect the structure and educational philosophy of an American university, thus making it a most competitive university in Europe and especially in the area of southeastern Europe.

The American University of Athens, welcomes visiting students from abroad who wish to spend a year, a semester, or a summer in Athens.

OBJECTIVES

AUA seeks to provide the student with an essential core of knowledge and a greater capacity for independent thought and judgment. It allows flexibility to enable its students to survey areas of possible interest, or concentrate in a particular major.

In the pursuit of its goals, AUA seeks to develop a sense of curiosity, a love of beauty, a sense of morality, a high standard of professional ethics and an eagerness for life-time learning. It also seeks to develop socially conscious and socially involved students who can and will act responsibly in relation to themselves and to others, and who will take on leadership roles in social and community affairs.

THE FACULTY

AUA’s faculty – a good mix with divergent views – are creative, dedicated professionals who take time to consider the welfare of the students. Members of the faculty have Ph.D. degrees with at least three years experience in American, British, or Greek universities.

SPECIAL FEATURES

The student body is truly international with more than ten different countries represented. Classes are small enough to ensure personal attention in a stimulating learning environment, making it an ideal learning environment, with close interaction between instructor and student. Academic counseling is an on-going process with counselors following the progress of students throughout the studies.

ADMISSION

Application and supporting documents as well as all correspondence concerning admission and accreditation should be sent to:

info@aua.edu

The following credentials are required in support of the application:

  1. An official transcript of the applicant’s academic record.

  2. Two letters of recommendation from college officers concerning the candidate’s personal and academic readiness for this particular program of study.

  3. A statement of authorized leave of absence for study at the American University of Athens.

The Office of Admissions of AUA has no deadline for application, however, most applications are received between January and April.

The processing of the application will take a week from the date of receipt of the completed application.

Information regarding travel to Greece, clothing, luggage; mail and banking in Athens is sent to students upon their acceptance.

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DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY – CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

ART HISTORY COURSES

AH 1031, 1032 SURVEY OF WESTERN ART I, II

A foundation for further study in the history of art. AH 1031: prehistoric to Gothic art. AH 1032: proto – Renaissance to modern art.

AH 2106 RENAISSANCE ART IN THE NORTH

Northern painting from Van Eyck through Bosch, Durer, and Brueghel.

AH 2116 NON WESTERN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

Survey of the arts of the non western areas presented in their historical and cultural context.

AH 3104 RENAISSANCE ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN ITALY I

Early developments from the 13th to the 15th century in art and architecture, the developments and dispersion of the Renaissance throughout Europe.

AH 3105 RENAISSANCE ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN ITALY II

Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy.

AH 3108 LATE ANTIQUE AND EARLY CHRISTIAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

An examination of art and architecture from Late Antiquity to Iconoclasm.

AH 3109 18TH-CENTURY ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE

Examination of Rococo, Neoclassicism, and English painting in the context of Western European historical and cultural developments. Emphasis on France, England, and Germany and the representative styles of Watteau, David and others.

AH 3110 19TH-CENTURY ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE II

Examination of Realism, Romanticism, Impressionism, and Post-impressionism in the context of Western European political and social environments with emphasis on the representative styles of Delacroix, Ingres, Courbet, Manet and Barbizon; also Seurat, Van Gogh and Gauguin.

AH 3115 CHRISTIAN ICONOGRAPHY

Origins and development of Christian symbols and themes from the early Christian era to the Council of Trent.

AH 3117 BYZANTINE ART AND ARCHITECTURE

A consideration of early Christian and Byzantine Art and Architecture from Iconoclasm to 1453.

AH 3118 WESTERN MEDIEVAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE

A course designed to familiarize students with Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque and Gothic Art and Architecture.

AH 3129 20TH-CENTURY ART ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE

Survey of 20th-century European painting, sculpture, and architecture, from their origins in the late 19th-century through the 20th-century. Emphasis on major modernist movements and artists, including Matisse, Picasso, Kandinsky, and Mondrian.

AH 4166 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL PERCEPTION

Introduction to theories of visual perception. Emphasis is placed on the function of visual thinking. Students become familiar with the character of the visual language and its basic elements.

AH 4200 SPECIAL STUDIES IN ART HISTORY

The course will introduce the student to special topics in several fields of art history.

BYZANTINE STUDIES

AH 1031, 1032 SURVEY OF WESTERN ART I, II

A foundation for further study in the history of art. AH 1031: prehistoric to Gothic art. AH 1032: proto – Renaissance to modern art.

AH 3108 LATE ANTIQUE AND EARLY CHRISTIAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

An examination of art and architecture from Late Antiquity to Iconoclasm.

AH 3115 CHRISTIAN ICONOGRAPHY

Origins and development of Christian symbols and themes from the early Christian era to the Council of Trent.

AH 3117 BYZANTINE ART AND ARCHITECTURE

A consideration of early Christian and Byzantine Art and Architecture from Iconoclasm to 1453.

AH 3118 WESTERN MEDIEVAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE

A course designed to mafiliarize students with Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque and Gothic Art and Architecture.

ARC 2101 GREEK ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

A study of the major achievements in architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaics from 1000 B.C. to mid 4th century. Special focus on the Parthenon and fifth-century Athens. Attention to recent discoveries and current excavations.

ARC 2102 ROMAN ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Investigation of the architecture, sculpture, wall paintings, and mosaics from the 2nd century B.C. to A.D. 300. Consideration both of the city of Rome and of the monuments and society in the provinces.

ART 1001 PRINCIPLES OF ART

An introduction to various art media, basic elements of art and thematic interpretations, European and non Western traditions.

CLA 2139 MAJOR GREEK AUTHORS

Selections from a wide variety of Greek prose, drama, and poetry.

CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

ARC 1100 INTRODUCTION TO AND HISTORY OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Theory, methods and aims of archaeology. Dating methods. Absolute and relative chronology in the Awgean. Important discoveries and excavations of the last 150 years. J.J. Winckelmann, Lord Elgin, H. Schliemann, J. Evans; the work of the Greek Archaeological Service and the foreign schools.

ARC 2101 GREEK ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

A study of the major achievements in architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaics from 1000 B.C. to mid 4th century. Special focus on the Parthenon and fifth-century Athens. Attention to recent discoveries and current excavations.

ARC 2102 ROMAN ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Investigation of the architecture, sculpture, wall paintings, and mosaics from the 2nd century B.C. to 300 A.D. Consideration both of the city of Rome and of the monuments and society in the provinces.

ARC 2126 THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES OF GREECE

Field trip. An on-site examination of the archaeological sites of ancient to Byzantine Greece designed to give students a full understanding of the civilization.

ARC 3104A: GREEK EPIGRAPHY

ARC 3104B: GREEK NUMISMATICS

A comprehensive study of the history of epigraphy/numismatics, with special reference to their economical, political and historical importance.

ARC 3121 ARCHAEOLOGY OF CLASSICAL GREECE I

An introduction to classical antiquity through the material remains of the period with special reference to Pausanias.

PHILOSOPHY COURSES

PHI 2111 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

History of Western philosophy from early Greece to the early Middle Ages.

PHI 2112 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY

History of Western philosophy of the 17th and 18th centuries (Descartes to Kant).

PHI 3121 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

A critical study of conflicting philosophies of education viewed from philosophical perspectives and compared with current practices. Aims to create understanding of several points of view, their philosophical development, and their applications for contemporary education.

PHI 3131 ETHICS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

Main types of ethical theory: egoistics, utilitarian, self-realization, conscience, existentialism. Applications to contemporary problems.

PHI 3135 ETHICS IN BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS

Basic concepts and theories of ethics for analysis of moral issues arising in business and professional practice.

PHI 3136 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

A critical study of conflicting philosophies of education viewed from philosophical perspectives and compared with current practices. Aims to create understanding of several points of view, their philosophical development, and their applications for contemporary education.

PHI 3151 MYTH, SCIENCE, AND THE MODERN MIND

An overview of the growth of scientific rationalism from its origin in mythopoetic thought to the present, with emphasis on conceptual and methodological developments and the nature of scientific revolutions. Comparison of the cosmological frameworks of Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, and Bohr.

PHI 3152 KNOWLEDGE, TRUTH, AND REALITY

Inquiry into the basis and structure of knowledge, the problem of perception and independent reality, the role of language in knowledge, and the meaning and criteria of truth.

PHI 3161 PHILOSOPHY OF IMAGINATION

The objective of this course is to investigate the formative concepts of imagination as they first emerged in the Greek and Biblical traditions, and later through the Medieval, Romantic, Existentialist and Postmodern periods of Western cultural history. The course draws on the disciplines of intellectual history, sociology, art criticism, literature and psychology though its primary focus is philosophical. Special emphasis on difference between Aristotelian and Kantian Epistemologies of Imagination.

PHI 3162 AESTHETICS

The problem of artistic representation and the nature of aesthetic experience as related to the creation, appreciation, and criticism of art.

PHI 3193 PHENOMENOLOGY AND EXISTENTIALISM

Kierkegaard’s existentialist reaction to Hegel; subjectivity and intentionality in 19th-century thought, leading to Husserl’s phenomenology; the philosophy of existence in Heidegger and Sartre; the relation between existentialism and Marxism in the later work of Sartre.

PHI 4127 THEORIES OF HISTORY

Major philosophies of history; Judeo-Christian, linear progressive, historicist, Hegelian – Marxian dialectical, cyclical (Vico, Spengler, Toynbee), and social-scientific (Comte, Weber). Contemporary problems of historical knowledge. Same as HIS 4127.

PHI 4132 SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY

Social Philosophies from Locke to the Frankfurt School, Habermas, and Western Marxism.

PHI 4192 ANALYTICAL PHILOSOPHY

The dominant movements of recent Anglo-American philosophy. Logical positivism, British ordinary language philosophy, and neopragmatism – represented by Russell, G.E. Moore, Wittgenstein, Ryle, Ayer, Goodman, Quine, etc.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND NATURAL SCINCES

BIOLOGY COURSES

BIO 1101 Introductory Biology for Science Majors I (4)

No prerequisite. An overview of the significant amount of information encompassing life. The course is focused mainly on describing the structure of and the main biochemical and physiological pathways within the cell. 3 lecture hours, 2 lab.

BIO 1102 Introductory Biology for Science Majors II (4)

Prerequisite: BIO 1101. General survey of micro organisms, plants and animals including morphology, physiology, embryology, ecology and evolutionary relationships among phyla. Designed to furnish a base for advanced studies in Life Sciences. 3 lecture hours, 2 lab.

BIO 2206 Biostatistics (3)

Prerequisites: MA 1123, BIO 2102. An introduction to the theoretical basis and the applications of statistics in connection to the Life Sciences with an emphasis on parametric methods.

BIO 3303 Microbiology (3)

Prerequisite: BIO 2102. A comprehensive examination of the fundamental aspects of Microbiology, including structure, metabolism, genetics, and taxonomy of a broad range of micro organisms. Special topics will cover aspects of environmental microbiology, food and medical microbiology.

BIO 3306 Genetics (3)

Prerequisite: BIO 2102. A study of classical organismal heredity and its molecular basis. Topics will include Mendelian principles, gene structure and function, and changes in the genetic material.

BIO 3310 Cell Biology (3)

Prerequisites: BIO 2102, CH 2209. The study of cellular structure and function. Special emphasis will be given to the molecular architecture of cells and to bio-energetics. A broad spectrum of both plant and animal cells will be explored.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

BPH 2901 Biomedical Sciences I (4)

This course is designed to provide the molecular and biochemical foundations necessary for understanding the basis of pharmaco therapeutics. The course involves the study of bio molecular interactions, macromolecular structure and functions, cellular catabolic and anabolic pathways, DNA metabolism, gene expression and biochemical bases of diseases. After completing this course, students will be able to apply biochemical principles that are requisite to the understanding of higher-level courses in medical microbiology, immunology, pharmacology and medicinal chemistry.

BPH 3902 Biomedical Sciences II –

Medical Microbiology/Immunology (4)

This course provides an in-depth study of the microbial world with emphasis on the nature and behavior of micro-organisms, the interrelationships that operate between microbes and the human host in health and disease, and the principles of prevention and control of infectious disease. Pathological and immunological changes induced by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, helminths, chlamydiae, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, L-forms, and prions and the way these organisms are affected by antimicrobials will be discussed. Basic and advanced mechanisms involved in infection and immunity encompassing natural and induced modes of host defence will be emphasized. Topics in immunology will also include vaccination strategies, immune-related diseases and transplantation immunology. Biotechnology and the use of micro-organisms in the production of biopharmaceuticals will be discussed. After completing this course students will be able to identify micro-organisms and characterize the infectious disease process.

CHEMISTRY-BIOCHEMISTRY

CH 1101 General Chemistry I (4)

No prerequisite. For students in science concentrations. Atomic structure and properties, periodic table, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, redox and acid-base reactions, ideal gas law, thermo chemistry. Introduction to quantum theory and atomic structure, properties of the elements. Lewis structures and VSEPR methods. 2 labs.

CH 1102 General Chemistry II (4)

Prerequisite: CH 1101. Continuation of CH 1101. MO theory, solids and liquids, colligate properties of solutions, entropy, free energy and chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, acid-base and redox equilibrium. Electrochemistry. Rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Main group and transition elements. 2 lab.

CH 1901 Food Science I (4)

The course surveys the complex of basic sciences that are fundamental to food processing and preservation, the application of these sciences to the technology of providing the consumer with food products that are at once appealing to the eye, pleasing to the palate, and nutritious to the human organism.

CH 1902 Food Science II (4)

The course explores the basic chemical nature of all important foods, and examines the various chemical, biochemical and nutritional changes that occur in food when it is stored, processed, preserved, cooked, eaten and digested

CH 2209 Organic Chemistry I (3)

Prerequisite: CH 1102. A course in the basic principles of organic chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the bonding and structure of organic molecules. Reactions and chemical properties are correlated with important reaction mechanisms. Fundamental principles of stereochemistry. 3 lecture hours.

CH 2210 Organic Chemistry II (3)

Prerequisites: CH 2209, CH 2219. A continuation of CH 2209 in which additional examples of organic structure and reaction mechanisms are

CH 3314 Biochemistry (3)

Prerequisite: CH 2210; corequisite: CH 3324. An introduction to the chemistry of living systems with emphasis on human biochemistry. The biosynthesis, metabolism, and function of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids will be discussed.

CH 3317 Physical Chemistry I (3)

Prerequisites: PY 2212, MA 2225, CH 1102. The fundamental laws governing the behavior of substances are explored. Among the topics discussed are the properties of gases, the basic laws of thermodynamics, changes of state, the principles of electrochemistry, and the laws of chemical kinetics.

CH 3318 Physical Chemistry II (3)

Prerequisites: PY 2253, MA 2226, CH 3317 or consent of instructor. An introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to atomic and molecular spectroscopy. An introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

PHYSICS

PY 1211 General Physics I (3)

Prerequisite: none; corequisite: MA 1123. First semester of a three-semester introductory physics course; kinematics, Newton’s laws, energy and work, linear and angular momentum, rigid bodies, gravitation.

PY 2222 General Physics Lab II (1)

Introductory physics lab, mainly in electricity and magnetism. It accompanies the PY 2212 course. 2 labs.

PY 2253 Vibrations and Waves (3)

Prerequisite: PY 2212; corequisite: MA 2225. Third semester of a three-semester introductory physics course: free, damped, and forced vibrations, normal modes, standing and travelling waves, dispersion, electromagnetic waves, reflection, refraction, interference and diffraction.

PY 3254 Elementary Modern Physics (3)

Prerequisites: PY 2253, MA 2225; corequisite: MA 2226. An introduction to the physics of relativity and quantum mechanics and their consequences in the understanding of atoms, solids and nuclei.

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